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This was a really great book.  Easy to read and not too long which is good for a busy mom like me.  It is written by a mother and daughter who have two different personalities.  She says if you imagine Marilla Cuthbert and Anne Shirley writing a book together, that’s what you’ll get in this book.  I can relate more to the even-keeled Marilla, and Anne is an example of a totally different emotional makeup.  Marilla is one of my favorite...

John Holt understands children.   If you are an educator of any kind, and that includes parents, take the time to read this book!  How are we teaching?   How do our students think?  How can I help them think?  Even with 300 pages, “How Children Fail” is a super easy read.  Holt’s conversation style and simple observations kept me glued to the pages. If you were a poor student, you will identify with this book.  If...

I really enjoyed this little book.  It was convicting for me.  We complain about the most mundane and normal things in life.  Chapter 8 especially was good about complainers in the church, and also about how parents can handle children who complain.  It was excellent.  Here is how Macarthur puts it. “The complaints have become more and more petty over time. Think about the things most people complain about, get anxious over, and even become enraged...

View this book on Amazon I used this book to help me through my morning Bible Reading of the Pentateuch this year.  I ended up not just referencing it, but reading thru it completely.  The simple terminology was so appreciated, perfect for the lay person.   The charts and summaries helped give the overview of the book.  So often we skim thru Numbers and Leviticus and miss the forest for the trees.  This year I wanted to try an exercise for myself...

As a teenager and then single adult, I thought organization meant neat shelves and matching totes, and I could actually get all if my work done without writing a single to do list!  I found out life requires much more than that. Reality hit me as a young wife and mother, as a family in full time ministry, and then as a home schooling mom.  I wish I had read this book much sooner! David Allen has been called one of the world’s most influential thinkers on productivity...

Deb Brammer has done it again.  This sequel to “Broken Windows” follows the same vein of wholesome Christian fiction for young adults. I enjoyed the discussion beginning in chapter 10 about relative truth vs absolute truth, and real vs. fake conversion.  Deb Brammer demonstrates her thorough understanding of far Eastern thought and the difficulties of cross-cultural communication.   I especially love how normal Christian life* is woven into the story. ...

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